Consider natural disasters that occurred, in “real life…aka “real time”

The Disaster Journal should only consider natural disasters that occurred, in “real life…aka “real time” between January and May 2020. Natural disasters do not include the aid of humans. Events such as oil and toxic materials spills, airplane crashes (unless caused by something like a hurricane or volcanic eruption), and human induced explosions should not be considered.

Consider natural disasters that occurred, in “real life…aka “real time”

The Disaster Journal should only consider natural disasters that occurred, in “real life…aka “real time” between January and May 2020. Natural disasters do not include the aid of humans. Events such as oil and toxic materials spills, airplane crashes (unless caused by something like a hurricane or volcanic eruption), and human induced explosions should not be considered.

The Disaster Summary will consist of information, as outlined below, on the ten worst real-life disasters that have occurred during this semester anywhere around the world. The worst disasters will be those with the greatest number of casualties and/or economic damage. It is possible that each student’s summary of the worst 10 disasters will differ as in some cases not enough information is available to determine the actual economic damage. By the end of the semester, you will have a collection/journal of the worst 10 disasters that occurred during semester.

Note that not all information on a disaster usually comes out with the first news release.

In other words, let’s imagine that there is flood that begins somewhere on September 17th. On the first day 250 homes are flooded resulting in 400 million dollars in property damage, with no lives lost. But the flooding continues for another two weeks. Each day the news media reports new events, such as number of new homes flooded, number of lives lost, loss estimates in various towns, etc. You should try to keep track of all of this information for your summary. You may find that a disaster will get repeated as more information gets released over time.
Note also that events like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions that occur in sparsely populate d areas, even though they may be large events, if they don’t cause casualties or property damage, are not likely to be among the ten worst disasters.

Any disaster that is ongoing at the beginning of the semester may be considered part of the assignment. For any disaster that begins during the semester, but is not completely finished by the end of the semester, you should report as much information that is available up to the deadline to turn in the log. You may have to look at more than one source to gather all the necessary information for a specific example.

Each disaster summary should include the following information:

Location of the Disaster (be specific here – countries like Indonesia, Russia, and China are large countries, so just reporting the country name is not a sufficient location).

Type of Disaster (i.e., hurricane, earthquake, volcanic eruption, landslide, etc.)

Beginning and ending dates and times of the disaster.

A description of the disaster and a short statement as to the cause of the disaster. If it is an earthquake or volcanic eruption, what was the plate tectonic setting? Provide details. Don’t just say, “Heavy rain led to flooding”. Say, “20 inches of rain fell in 24 hours and the river level reached 28 ft.”

The total economic loss due to property damage, lost business, downtime, cleanup, and recovery etc., if available (in dollars). If a monetary figure is not available, provide information on such things as the number of structures destroyed, the number of people affected, the number of acres destroyed, number of livestock destroyed, etc.

The total number of human casualties (injuries and deaths)

Mitigation

A well thought out statement of what, if anything could have been done by humans to have prevent ed or reduce d the economic damage and number of casualties for each disaster. Think about things we have discussed in class. Do not say that nothing could have been done. Nothing could have been done to have prevent ed the geologic even (i.e., earthquake, volcanic eruption, flood), but things can always have been done to have mitigate d the damage caused by the even.

Sources of information (Newspaper and magazine articles, television and radio reports, and internet URLs)
The Disaster Journal must be in chronological order (earliest to latest) as near as is possible. Part of the grade will be based on the ease with which the instructor can read and grade the summary – appearance and organization will count. Use a 12-point type font, double-spacing, and 1-inch margins.
Example Entry #3
Snowstorm in Tokyo Japan

Location: Tokyo japan

Type of Disaster: Winter Storm

Time: Started Saturday Feb. 8 and ended Sunday Feb 9

Description:

Snow storms rarely hit Tokyo in any great severity due to Mt. Fuji to the west of the city. The mountain blocks the majority of the snow that comes toward the city and storms that come from the south or east are generally rain events, but on Saturday a large front came across the island. The storm dumped 8 to 20 inches of snow, with winds blowing upwards of 50 MPH, on the Tokyo region creating gridlock and power outages.

Economic loss: Too soon to give dollar amount. The whole of Tokyo was in gridlock with over 700 flights cancel ed. The wind and snow caused over 40,000 homes to lose power. The high speed rail system was slow ed and roads in Tokyo were impassible in places.

 
Human loss: 11 people reported dead due to car accidents and 1200 injured. Though reports are still coming in.

Mitigation: Japan is known for their weather mitigation programs for hurricanes and earthquakes. However, this storm is something which only happens once every 20 years. To prepare Japan could have issued a mandate to keep people off the roads during the winter storm. This does not stop all accidents but could prevent a number of them. To mitigate the economic loss the Tokyo area could have dispatched extra crews to keep the power grid running consistently as well as extra crews to keep the trains running on time. The major delays were in the airlines, but airlines really do rely on the weather for travel and the only thing I see mitigating loss would be to give early notice to travelers so that they have plans made out ahead of time to travel the next day or the day after by plane.

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